Prasiolite spider and a boy who could see the future

I.

Prasiolite a gem forged in warmth and to which, it is said, it ultimately returns whilst carrying and dispersing this innate property amongst all those in need.

This is a gem of the heart, and despite not being perceived at first glance as a flame bearer will, if one permits, come to imbed its warmth therein. It is a gentle and quiet creature, much akin to a leaf or beautiful flower and yet one should not be fooled by its ostensible tenderness. It is a resilient and strong stone whose warmth, despite its gentle demure of soft green cascades, will endure for a long time, carrying with it its secret vision, lodged deep within its facets.

 

II.

It was believed that prasiolite brings vision to those who have the innate gift of seeing the things to come, to reveal lees of time and whiffs of future winds. There is a legend that comes to us from distant lands about a boy who received a gift from his uncle, a stone spider carved out of prasiolite by the skillful hands of an old master. The boy thought it was beautiful, even though it scared all the other children because it was so realistic, with its green misty eyes looking alive with a profound glare into the distance. The boy liked the gift but confused by the strangeness of its appearance asked his uncle whether a spider should not be either black or brown, instead of green. Smiling, his uncle explained that this spider makes its web in which it catches visions of the future, and that it was made of a kind of stone imbued with special powers, dug up in a country of great wisdom many years ago. It was one of a kind, his uncle said and the boy grew to love this gift.

 

III.

The boy changed, legend says. He started seeing the future. When he looked at women and men, he saw them not as before, but saw instead the entirety of their future looming over them. These visions began to repeat themselves and after a time the boy realized that he had a special gift, the gift of prescience.

But this gift was not kind to the boy. In other people’s lives he encountered only sadness and grief: death, adversity, injury, illness, poverty ... life to him seemed filled with a consistency of sad and unfortunate events from which there was no escape. He told no one of his power and carried with him a secret sense of shame, as if the things he knew would come to pass were in some way his own doing.

The boy grew older with this sense of sadness as his ever present companion. Though everyone tried to divine the cause of his constant sadness, he just shook his head, averting his eyes, not wanting to look at any one for fear of what he might see.

 

IV.

Finally, the boy`s mother wrote to his uncle beseeching him to come and talk to the boy. His uncle came and though at first the boy did not wish to talk to him, yet owing to his persistence and the profound bond which existed between the two, eventually the boy yielded to his uncle’s probing and recounted to him everything that had happened and told him all about the things he had seen. After he had finished speaking he immediately felt as if a great weight had been lifted off his shoulders and his mind was, if for a moment, at ease. But his sense of despair endured and did not leave him as he felt now more than ever a feeling of utter hopelessness and that nothing could ever help him withstand the tortures of being privy to the hidden destinies of men.

 

V.

The boy`s uncle, a wise man and a great traveler who had seen many things on this earthly plane, having listened to his nephew’s story fell silent and thought long and hard. He asked the boy if he had kept the prasiolite spider he had given him. The boy nodded, and took out a wad he kept close to his heart. Uncle looked at the spider figurine with a deep, concerned, but interested look, once again coming to admire its intrinsic beauty and recollecting how he had acquired that object of great allure and power. Turning to his nephew he concluded: I cannot help you but maybe I know someone who can. There is an old sage who lives deep in the mountains, he said. He has lived for a thousand years and he will live a thousand more. It was told to me that it was he who found the stone from which this spider was carved and. if anyone can help you, he most certainly can, his uncle said.  After all the time that had elapsed since he had first been presented with the gift by his uncle, the boy saw the faintest glimmer of hope.

 

VI.

He said goodbye to his crying mother, and went into the mountains. He travelled long and he travelled far because the wise man was hard to find, and on his journey came to see many things. Everywhere along the way he saw people and the misfortunes they carried, like great bundles of truth hanging over their shoulders to whose existence they were entirely, oblivious. But the dwellings of wisdom being far removed from that land the boy had to travel a long time and many years passed before he had finally found the man he sought. In that time this boy had become a young man.

 

VII.

The sage was sitting all alone inside a deep cave. The entrance was covered in snow as if to cover the trail of foresight, ashamed of what it would utter to the world. The sage was sitting without fire or clothes, as if the cold which enveloped his surroundings was not of his world. When the boy approached the sage, he felt gravely disheartened. The sage too carried a large burden on his shoulder, a burden of profound loneliness. The young man sat down and wept, weary after his long journey, and tiered of carrying with him the misfortunes of the world.

The sage asked him why he cried and what was it that he had seen in his future. The young man said: Desolation. You're alone and you'll forever be alone. The sage nodded and replied: It is true. This is the life I have chosen, but look again. Indeed, the young man looked, and saw the laughter and joy of many people and animals too, helped by the sage`s doing. I want to help these people too, exclaimed the boy, teach me how! Those are the people whom you have already helped, the sage replied, and you can see them in my future because I will help lead you towards the right path. The boy was left speechless and they sat for a long time in absolute silence. The sage finally spoke and said, Do not weep on account of misfortune, as you will be weeping forever. Though it is sad to behold, yet it remains an all too necessary part of existence, as air, water, and snow in the heights of the mountain. Just bring with you joy wherever you can, and carry it in your eyes. Your gift will allow you to bring happiness to many people because it is a great gift. The young man just sat, nodding slowly, then started to cry. But he cried no more.

He turned without a word and from that day forward he no longer shed tears. He went home, where he was awaited by his old mother and did many a good deed with the gift that was brought to him by a prasiolite figurine.